Differentiate Product Implementing Strategies

Strategy Readiness Interest Learning Profile
Tiered Products readiness bullet
Tic Tac Toe readiness bullet interest bullet learning profile bullet
Learning Menus readiness bullet interest bullet learning profile bullet
RAFT readiness bullet interest bullet learning profile bullet

Tiered Products

Tiered Products

Keep in Mind

To design and match the product assignments to the students’ readiness levels, teachers should refer to the pre-assessment and ongoing assessments results.

As activities can be tiered to differentiate the learning process, so too can products be tiered to differentiate how students demonstrate their learning. When teachers assess students’ knowledge in this way, they design a range of products that are challenging for students at different levels of readiness (in general low, middle, and high groups).

The example below illustrates the use of tiered products. By being aware of her students’ readiness levels, the teacher has developed a different assignment for each level of learner: Group 1, below grade-level learners; Group 2, grade-level learners; and Group 3, above grade-level learners.

Language Arts-Fifth Grade

Key Concept: Make and Revise Predictions.
Lesson: Students have been reading a novel, The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare. They have just finished the first chapter and will make predictions based on the events that have transpired. Their predictions will come in written form and will be turned in at the end of class.

Group 1 Group 2 Group 3
These students need to understand the events of the first chapter of the novel. They will have read the chapter but will answer questions given to them to check on their comprehension of the facts of the chapter first. After understanding the facts, they will write a letter from Kit to her friend in Barbados telling what she expects will happen next. The letter needs to be turned in at the end of the class. These students will analyze the events in chapter one. They will analyze according to Kit’s thoughts concerning her “disappointment in America.” They will focus on analysis of why America would be disappointing to a person who was coming from Barbados. Do a prewriting exercise of creating a Venn diagram that shows a comparison of America (as Kit sees it) and Barbados (as Kit remembers it). Then use your information to write a journal entry from Kit’s point of view that explains why she is so disappointed and predicts what she thinks will happen next. Turn in your journal entry at the end of the class. These students will synthesize the words used in chapter one according to what the words help them learn about Kit. They will then predict what will happen next from a synthesis of the words used to tell the events in the first chapter. Important words to present to them to begin their search are embarrassment (p.6), dour-looking (p.7), impulsively (p.8), Heathen Island (p.11), Puritans (p.12), humiliation (p.13), respectable woman (p. 13), and nonchalance (p. 14). If they do not know word meanings, they should begin their search in a dictionary. Then they should write Kit’s explanation (in any form they choose) of what has happened and what she predicts next. Turn in the piece at the end of class.

Adapted from http://www.doe.in.gov/exceptional/gt/tiered_curriculum/languagearts/la5r.htm

Tic Tac Toe

Tic Tac Toe

tick tack toe grid

Tic-tac-toe, sometimes referred to as Think-tac-toe, is a method of offering students choices in the type of products they complete to demonstrate their knowledge. As in a traditional tic-tac-toe game, students are presented with a nine-cell table of options. The teacher should make sure that all options address the key concept or skill being learned. There are several variations on this method:
  • Students choose three product options that form a horizontal, vertical, or diagonal line.
  • Students choose one product choice from each row or from each column (without forming a straight line).
  • The teacher can create two or more versions to address the different readiness levels.

In the example below, a high-school teacher creates a Tic-tac-toe assignment for a unit on Romeo and Juliet. The teacher wants the students to complete assignments for three categories: characters, setting, and theme. Notice that the teacher creates three assignments for each of these categories, resulting in a total of nine tasks from which students can choose.

Example

Directions: Complete one activity from each row.

Characters Write an essay comparing and contrasting yourself to one of the major characters. Create a list of at least five interview questions to ask Romeo or Juliet about what the reader should learn from their experiences. Create an audio including the questions and answers. Now that you’ve read Romeo and Juliet and watched Westside Story, create a play that contains these two major characters and is set in modern times.
Setting Choose your favorite scene and describe how the setting affects the mood of the play. Choose your favorite scene and create a detailed scaled model of it. Choose your favorite scene and write an essay describing the differences in the settings of Romeo and Juliet and Westside Story.
Theme List five well-known quotes from the play. List the character who said the quote and describe how each quote relates to a major theme of the play. Create a table that compares and contrasts the Montagues and Capulets with the Hatfields and McCoys. Create a video trailer for a new version of the movie Romeo and Juliet.

Learning Menus

Learning Menus

When teachers use learning menus, or choice boards, they offer students four to six options for producing a final product. Each choice should be challenging and should require approximately the same amount of time to complete. Below are some examples of product choices that teachers can include in a menu.

Examples of Product Choices
  • Video
  • Poster
  • Web page
  • Mock trial
  • Letter to the editor
  • Exhibit
  • News report
  • Written report
  • Diorama
  • Skit
  • Puppet show
  • Map
  • Demonstration
  • Photo essay
  • Play
  • Creative writing project
  • Travel brochure
  • Song
  • Poem
  • PowerPoint presentation
  • Debate
  • Reenactment
  • Diagram
  • Advertising campaign

Although there are a number of ways to offer these choices, some teachers present them as a dinner menu. For this method, students often select one “entree” task and two “side-dish” tasks. Additionally, students may elect to complete a “dessert” task for enrichment. Below is an example of one such dinner menu.

The School Diner – Idioms

appetizer, soup

Appetizer (You must do this)
  • With a partner, select one idiom from the bulletin board. Discuss what you think the idiom means. Then look up the idiom in the book In a Pickle: And Other Funny Idioms, Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms, or Super Silly Sayings That Are Over Your Head: A Children’s Illustrated Book of Idioms. You can find copies in the class library.

appetizer, soup

Entrees (You must do all)
  • Read one of the following books provided by the teacher:
    • Any Amelia Bedelia book
    • Butterflies in My Stomach and Other School Hazards
    • Reach for the Stars and Other Advice for Life’s Journey
    • You Are What You Eat and Other Mealtime Hazards
  • Make a list of all of the idioms in the book and write their meaning.

appetizer, soup

Side Dishes (Select at least two)
  • Write an idiom you have heard used in your life and explain what it means. Draw a picture of what the main character of the story you read might do if he or she heard it.
  • Select an idiom from the bulletin board or one that you have heard used and add it to the story you read. Write at least 6 sentences.
  • With a partner, create a short skit using an idiom from the bulletin board or one that you have heard used.

appetizer, soup

Dessert (Optional)
  • Learn more about idioms from other cultures.
    • Read I’m Not Hanging Noodles on Your Ears and Other Intriguing Idioms From Around the World
    • Use the bookmarks on the computer to visit several Websites that illustrate idioms from other cultures.

RAFT

RAFT

raft stands for role, audience, format, and topicTeachers can offer students product choices by using a RAFT (role, audience, format, topic). Each column specifies the role the student will adopt, the audience he will address, the format of the work, and the topic to be addressed. Sometimes, students are asked to choose a row, and sometimes they are asked to make a selection from each column. In other instances, the teacher may assign students a row that matches their readiness levels. Typically, RAFTs can be completed in a relatively short amount of time and can be assigned as classwork or homework.

Example

A fourth-grade social studies class is studying the colonization of America. The teacher creates the following RAFT for this unit.

Role Audience Format Topic Profile
Pilgrim relatives in England letter the first winter
Myles Standish male pilgrims old enough to defend the colony map of settlement defending the settlement
John Carver future generations diary establishing and maintaining law and order
Squanto other members of his tribe oral report of observations (audio recording) settlers (physical characteristics, ways of life, daily routines)
Journalist newspaper subscriber newspaper article the landing of the Mayflower
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